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Best Before to Expiry Date
Best Before to Expiry Date
According to Justice D K Jain, president National Consumer Disputes Redressal commission (NCDRC) the FSSAI should look into this issue as these labels cause a lot of confusion in the minds of consumers. The organisation wonders if whether the ‘best before’ label means that the food will still be fit for human consumption six months after the completion of the ‘best before’ date. In simple terms Best Before is the date the manufacturer says that the product retains its peak freshness. The ‘best before’ date does not inform the consumer about spoilage nor does it say that the food is no longer safe for consumption. On the other hand the Expiry Date on a food package tells consumers the last day a product is safe to consume. The food cannot be consumed even a day after that date because it could cause illness and in rare cases even death. Reasons for confusion in the ‘best before’ and ‘expiry date’ and which are of concern to the NCDRC are that •According to FSSAI foods that are labelled ‘Best Before’ can still be sold in the market. The question then is that for how many months after the ‘best before” date can such foods be safe to eat. Will they be safe to eat for three months, six months or one year? •The ‘best before’ date applies to unopened packages of food only. Once the package is opened there is no guarantee of the ‘best before’ date or that the food will remain as fresh, nutritious and flavoured. •Consumers cannot use their nose, eyes and taste buds to detect if the food is safe so how will they know if the food is still good to eat after the ‘best before’ date has passed. •How do consumers know that the food has just lost some of it quality only and that the food has not been contaminated with micro-organisms or toxins since the food labelled ‘best before’ might not look spoilt after it has passed that date? In most cases consumers throw away food that has passed its ‘best before’ date as they treat it just like an ‘expiry date’ so what is the need for two types of labelling? We have to wait and see what steps the FSSAI will take to make these labelling changes in food items so there is no confusion in the minds of consumers. Union Minister for Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, Ram Vilas Paswan is of the opinion that food items should carry only “expiry date”, and not “best before” date since that does indicate the safety of the food and so has no meaning. NEWS SOURCE- http://foodsafetyhelpline.com/2015/12/will-fssai-make-changes-in-food-labelling/